Tag Archives: endangered

Endangered Earth


In the past 10 years we have lost several animal species – in this day and age we consider ourselves better than our predecessors, yet we are still the main cause of animals going extinct… we’re no better than those before us – in some ways we’re worse, as we are not doing what we do to survive; we are doing it for “fun” or “progress”. In what civilised or ‘advanced’ society is there place for this abominable behaviour? Yes, this post is looking to be an informative rant-type…

In the past century many animal species have been wiped from the planet, below is a selection (from the past decade) of those lost forever:
(1) 2015 – Eastern Cougar
(2) 2014 – Malagasy Hippopotamus
(3) 2013 – Formosan Clouded Leopard
(4) 2012 – Pinta Tortoise
(5) 2012 – Zanzibar Leopard
(6) 2012 – Japanese River Otter
(7) 2011 – Western Black Rhinoceros
(8) 2010 – Alatora Grebe
(9) 2010 – Derwent River Sea Star
(10) 2009 – Christmas Island Pipistrelle Bat
(11) 2008 – Spotted Green Pigeon (Liverpool Pigeon)
(12) 2008 – Caribbean Monk Seal

Many species that are extinct today is due to humans – we hunt to extinction, we destroy habitats, we remove animals from the wild for fashion or entertainment – we first make them extinct in the wild and then we deplete the captive animals until they’re gone… and many other reasons.
The ICUN Red List contains information of the endangerment of species.
We used to hunt sustainably for food, and in many countries/cultures this is still the case, but most of the hunting (at least in first world cultures) is for “fun” or “sport” and is unjustifiably cruel and unnecessary. The man that hunts to feed his family and/or community is not the reason Elephants and Rhino’s are depleting in number and becoming extinct; the cruelty of riding out with a pack of dogs to have them tear apart an innocent fox is not for any justifiable reason; the mind-set of people needs to change to make a difference… the bans we have in place need to be enforced to make a difference… we all want a better world but that won’t happen if we cannot really change.

We have bans (in certain countries) on things like fox hunting, whale hunting (whaling), shark finning, dog and cock fighting, removing animals from the wild (with conservation excepted), and many more abhorrent things – yet these bans are not universal, and often not enforced. If there are no consequences for these actions, or these consequences are not adhered to and/ or enforced, then what power do these bans have? Where then is the protection for these creatures?

Red Fox

Animals are a lot more important to their ecosystems than people give them credit for – the removal or addition of one species has an affect on everything around it. Take the reintroduction of wolves to Yellowstone National Park for example – video link here (this is in no way my video) – thanks to wolves being back in the ecosystem, the rivers went back to how they used to be, plants that had been destroyed by the overpopulation of deer returned, because the wolves kept down the deer population – things went back to the way they were; back to how they should be. Why did the ecosystem breakdown in the first place; why did the wolves become extinct in Yellowstone? Because of us. Because of humans. Because we killed them off…Grey Wolf

The way we are going, the same thing will happen again and again, with more species. We, as a species, need to change before we are the only species left on a dying planet – small steps to ensure that other species don’t become myth and fairy-tales, instead of living, breathing creatures that share this planet.

World Elephant Day: 12 August 2016

#WorldElephantDay on social media to spread awareness (www.worldelephantday.org).

Common Elephant Facts:

  • It is thought that there used to be approximately 350 different species of elephant on the planet, at one time.
  • Today there are only two species left; the Asian elephant, and the African elephant .
  • Wild lifespan of 60-70 years; captive lifespan of below 40 years.
  • Gestation (pregnancy): 22 months.
  • Live together in (familial) herds of 10-100 elephants, led by the matriarch.
  • Young males will leave the family heard, and often form smaller bachelor groups, once sexual maturity is reached.
  • Known to visit ‘elephant graveyards’ and mourn the death of herd members.
  • Their trunk is used like a finger/hand – to grab things, such as food or to move obstacles out of their way; as well as sometimes being used to hold onto the tail of the elephant in front during walkies!

African_elephant_(Loxodonta_africana)_reaching_up_1
African Elephant – using trunk to get food (Open Source Google Image)

Asian Elephant Facts:

  • also known as the Indian elephant.
  • smaller in size than the African, weighing up to 5 tonnes, reaching 6.4 metres in length, and 3 metres in height.
  • small ears, straight at the bottom.
  • only males have tusks; not all males get tusks.
  • five toes on the front feet; four toes on the back feet.
  • estimated to be less than 50,000 remaining in the wild – classification: endangered.

Asian Elephant (Open Source Google Image)
Asian Elephant (Open Source Google Image)

African elephants:

  • larger of the two elephant species, weighing up to 6 tonnes, reaching 7.5 metres in length, and 3.3 metres in height.
  • large, round edged ears; used as fans in the heat (plus excess heat is released from the large surface area).
  • of the African, there are two subspecies; bush or savanna and forest.
  • both males and females have tusks.
  • African elephants are left or right-tusked (like we are left or right-handed); the dominant tusk is often smaller due to wear and tear.
  • five front toes; three hind toes.
  • estimated to be 470,000 remaining in the wild – classification: vulnerable.

African Elephant (Open Source Google Image)
African Elephant (Open Source Google Image)