Category Archives: Cats

11th November – We Remember


This day, 11th November, we set aside to remember all the fallen in war; the hero’s who gave their today, for our tomorrow. These brave people and animals gave their lives, fighting to preserve all that they, and we, hold dear. Their selfless acts and sacrifices allow us the freedom we have; for that, and so much more, we remember them.

Horses are the animals primarily thought of when war animals are mention (at least in my experience in conversations); a war horse had many uses. Depending on the military role of the division in which a horse was placed, would often determine the use(s) of the animal.

A war horse would carry soldiers into battle, be used as transport for messengers, would pull equipment, machinery, artillery, supply carts, and much more. However, horses were integral to the war, and soldiers would form bonds with their horse, often sleeping close together for warmth when necessary. Donkey’s and Mule’s would also have been used for similar roles; however less so as transport for riders.

Perhaps a lesser-known animal used for pulling equipment and supplies, not used on the battlefield, but back home. Due to the usual animals used (horses, mules, donkeys, etc) as they had been taken into war, their roles at home were taken over by some less-common animals in their absence. Elephants and camels were used for transporting materials and such, as well as for ploughing fields, hauling hay/straw, and other every-day jobs that needed to be done. One of the more famous, was Lizzie the Indian elephant (pictured below); once part of a travelling circus, had her role in life completely altered by WW1 just as many people had – and she was put to work in a scrap metal yard in Sheffield.

Pigeons and dogs were also used to carry messages during war. Pigeons were useful with their homing instincts, being able to bring them back to where the message came from – thus being able to return a response message to the correct place as necessary. Dogs were able to navigate trenches and battlefields with more ease and speed than a human soldier, which made them great at transporting messages this way. Dogs had other uses in war, such as; being guard and/or watch dogs, using their keen sense of smell to find injured soldiers on the battlefield and carry medical supplies, as ratters, and (my no means least) as companions.

Cats would also have been used for companionship, as well as for rodent control in the trenches and living areas of the soldiers, as well as on Naval ships. As rodents spread disease and deplete food supplies, cats were of great value in war-time.

Although you probably wouldn’t have thought it, slugs were also of great value during war. How? Well, slugs have the ability to detect gas before humans. They close up their breathing pores and compress their body to protect themselves, and survive the gas. As such, soldiers would take a “Slug Brigade” with them, and when they saw the slugs react to gas, they put on their gas masks before the gas reached harmful levels, and many lives were saved.

Thanks to brave men and women on the battlefields, and back home; thanks to the many animals playing their part on the battlefields, and back home; thanks to the sacrifices made by so many, we have the lives we live today.

Please check out my November 2014 post Remembrance to see other animals that have been used in wars throughout history.


All other images are open source, Google images, or my own – or photos donated for use by the pet owners.


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Your cat and the big outdoors


New cat or kitten? Wanting to let them roam the big, wide world outside? Stop and think before you do, to ensure the safest way to introduce your cat to the outdoors.

Kittens Outside

You must note that there are differences in introducing a young kitten and an adult cat to the outdoors.

With an adult cat, keep them indoors 3-6 weeks before letting them venture outdoors; cats have a great ‘homing beacon’ and if you let them out straight away will find their way back to where home was before you brought them home with you. Keeping your cat indoors for minimum of 3 weeks will sort of ‘re-set’ this, so your home becomes theirs and they will then find their way back to you. This also applies with adult cats when you move house – keep them inside until your new location becomes theirs.

With a kitten there is a bit more preparation before letting them outside – this is first for a new kitten! Ensure your kitten is micro-chipped in case they get lost; vaccinated to avoid illness or disease; and neutered at the appropriate age to avoid any unplanned litters!

Work on recall in the home before letting your cat/kitten out – calling them and shaking their favourite bag of treats, or something similar so they know to come back when called.

Cat Collar

If you want to put a collar on your cat/kitten (many people choose to so a bell can be added), ensure you get a collar that can has some sort of [emergency] release so the collar will break if it is stuck on something, and it won’t harm your pet. Bells on collars do reduce the success rate of hunts, however won’t ever completely prevent the occasional successful hunt.

At first it is wise to monitor your cat/kitten on their first adventure outside to ensure they don’t get into too much trouble, and so you’re on hand if they do! You may wish to firstly take your cat/kitten out on a harness and lead to let them get used to the smells and surroundings and layout of your garden in a controlled environment.

Whilst outside, sit and play and explore with your pet to allow them to get used to, and enjoy this new setting. Practise recall in the garden with your pet, being sure to reward, fuss and praise them when they come back when called.


Kitten exploring

Eventually allow your cat/kitten more time outside without you, until they want to venture out on their own.

As cats are nocturnal, they spend the nights active and hunting – to allow your pet outside of an evening/night it is advisable to get a cat flap. With a cat flap, you won’t have a restless cat that has been cooped up all night, and you won’t be disturbed by your pet asking to be let out. The best options are cat flaps that open via magnets (one in the flap and one on the collar of your cat(s)), or that open when registered microchips are within a certain proximity. These kinds of flaps ensure no cats that are not of your household can enter.

For any further advice or any questions on this topic, please do not hesitate to contact me via any of the methods below.


All images are open source, Google images, WordPress supplied images, my own images, or photos donated for use.


If you have any questions or comments; please post a comment below, or contact Ali’s Answers via one of my social media pages…

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Moving: With Pets (Part 1)

Moving is stressful when it’s just you and your junk (speaking from experience) – but how does moving take its toll on your pets? You can bet they’ll be stressed and anxious too, even if they’re not packing or trying to organise a removal company!

Here are some tips to help your pets cope with moving… part 1: packing and travelling.

On a practical level – remember to update your contact details on microchips, tags, pet passports, etc. – as well as with your pet insurance company and your local vet. If you’re moving a significant distance, remember to find a new local vet and get all your pet’s details transferred.

Updating the tag is something you can do easily, and may choose to do before moving day in case your pet wanders off during or post transit.

Packing:

Your pet’s belongings and foodstuffs – if you can pack these last do. In particular pack bowls/bottles last so that your pet can have a drink upon arrival, as they will likely need one!

If you have a designated area in your home for your pet and will do so in your new home, this can all be packed last so your pet can chill whilst you pack up, and then unpacked first so your pet can begin to settle whilst you move the rest of your stuff in.

Maine coon snoozing on suitcases

Welfare:

If your pet is prone to being anxious in transit there are steps you can take to ensure their welfare is one of the top priorities on moving day…

• Allocate one person (if possible) to be in charge of your pet – checking on them at regular intervals during the move to ensure they’re doing okay.

• Ensure the removal company staff know where your pet is and how their belongings are to be transported – i.e. any of your pet’s things that are to stay with your pet and not be packed deep into the removal van you should make the removal co. staff aware of.

• Pheromone sprays and collars are very beneficial to a distressed pet – companies such as Feliway and Adaptil provide such items for dogs and cats (for more information please click here for Feliway and here for Adaptil).

• Animals can be placed into carriers with a familiar scented item (current bedding rather than fresh, blanket or owners item of clothing, etc).

• Placing a blanket or towel or sheet over the carrier can also help in keeping your pet calm.

• Ensure pets in carriers have something to keep them occupied if they so wish – you don’t want chewing of carrier bars (potentially damaging their teeth/gums) when you could provide a chew toy to keep them occupied.

• Ensure your pet is secure in transit; whether this means entrusting someone responsible to holding the carrier, or fitting the carrier safely into a vehicle, or ensuring your dog’s seat-belt is secure and he can’t get to anything he shouldn’t whilst on the move – make sure your pet is safe and secure.
A big pet peeve of mine is people who have dogs loose in the car – not only is their jumping about distracting to you and other drivers, even a small dog (say 5-10kg in weight) can cause serious damage to you if you have an accident and the dog is thrown into someone – not to mention the injury the dog will sustain by being unrestrained! We wear seat-belts to avoid injury if we were to be involved in an accident; its the same principal – secure your dog.

• If you ware moving far away and the journey is long – remember your pet would enjoy a bathroom/ water break and a leg stretch. Ensure that any exercise is done safely and with your pet on a lead – your can get harnesses/leads for dogs, cats, rabbits, ferrets and more.

 

To follow: I will cover moving with fish, amphibians and reptiles, and once you’re in your new place.


All images are open source, Google images, or my own – or photos donated for use by the pet owners.


If you have any questions or comments; please post a comment below, or contact Ali’s Answers via one of my social media pages…
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A-Z: Cat Breeds (8)

Over 8 posts, I am going to go through cat breeds, and cover some basic titbits about the breeds; a little bit of history surrounding the breed, including the original use for the breed, and some other interesting facts.

This, the eighth and final, post will cover W-Z of cat breeds… basically I am doing an A-Z of cat breeds, covering 1-3 breeds per letter.

If I do not cover the breed of your cat in this post, and you would like me to; please leave the breed in the thoughts comment box below, or post it via the contact page, or get in touch via any social media pages listed at the end of each post – this way I can include your breed in another post (either the follow up, or a repeat with different breeds). Do the same if you want more information than I have provided on any particular cat breed, or if you would like to share a photo of your cat(s)!

W

There are no cat breeds for this letter.

X

There are no cat breeds for this letter; however see below image of an x-ray of a domestic cat.

X-Ray of a domestic cat

Y

York Chocolate

Country of Origin: USA

Lifespan: (approx.) 15 years               Breed Size: Large                

Hair/Fur Length: Semi-Longhair     Colour(s): Chocolate

Breed History: In 1983, on a farm, the first York Chocolate was born in a litter to a (shorthaired) black and white female, fathered by a (longhaired) black male. One kitten of the litter was semi-longhair, chocolate coloured female. The kitten was named Brownie by the farm owner. Brownie had her own litter, and produced within it a semi-longhair, chocolate male named MinkyMinky was eventually bred with Brownie (his mother), producing a litter with two semi-longhair, chocolate kittens – a male named Teddy Bear and a female named Cocoa.  The breed was named by farm owner, Janet Cheifari, after her hometown of New York and the unique colour of the breed. By 1989 Janet had bred another 27 York Chocolate kittens.

This breed is not yet recognised by any official cat organisations, as a recognised breed as such, as it is considered as still being developed. It is recognised by some associations as an ‘experimental’ breed.

Outstanding Physical Trait: Unique chocolate colouration.

Z

There are no cat breeds for this letter.; however see below some images of adorable sleeping “Zzz” kitties!

 

 


All images are open source, Google images, or my own – or photos donated for use by the pet owners.


If you have any questions or comments; please post a comment below, or contact Ali’s Answers via one of my social media pages…
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A-Z: Cat Breeds (7)

Over 8 posts, I am going to go through cat breeds, and cover some basic titbits about the breeds; a little bit of history surrounding the breed, including the original use for the breed, and some other interesting facts.

This, the seventh, post will cover S-V of cat breeds. In the follow-up (and final) post I will look into cat breeds from W-Z… basically I am doing an A-Z of cat breeds, covering 1-3 breeds per letter.

If I do not cover the breed of your cat in this post, and you would like me to; please leave the breed in the thoughts comment box below, or post it via the contact page, or get in touch via any social media pages listed at the end of each post – this way I can include your breed in another post (either the follow up, or a repeat with different breeds). Do the same if you want more information than I have provided on any particular cat breed, or if you would like to share a photo of your cat(s)!

S

Scottish Fold

Country of Origin: Scotland, UK

Lifespan: 11-15 years               Breed Size: Medium

Hair/Fur Length: Shorthair and Longhair

Colour(s):  White, Blue, Cream, Red, Silver, Cameo, Brown, Tortoiseshell, Black – in solid colouration, bi-colour, tri-colour, tabby, ticked/spots.

Breed History:  The origin of this breed is said to stem from a mouser in a farmer’s barn in 1961; a white cat with unusually folded ears, named Susie. Susie mated with a local tom cat; a local shepherd named William Ross acquired one of the kittens and named her Snooks. William bred Snooks, and then bred one of her kittens with a British Shorthair, which resulted in a litter of “lop eared cats”. While the Scottish Fold is generally Shorthaired, from Susie the trait for Longhair has been passed down – a Longhaired Scottish Fold is often known as a Highland Fold.

Outstanding Physical Trait: The folded ears. kittens are born with straight ears, which may fold at about 3 weeks old (they do not always fold). The fold could be a single – a fold half way up the ear, or a double – where the ears sit tighter to the head, or a triple – where the ears lie flat against the head (which is the desired ear fold for show cats).

Sphynx

Country of Origin: Toronto, Canada (not Egypt as many think due to the name)

Lifespan: 10-15 years                    Breed Size: Medium                

Hair/Fur Length: Hairless           Colour(s): All colours and patterns

Breed History: Developed as a breed in the mid-1960’s, when a domestic shorthair had a hairless kitten in her litter (named Prune). Prune was a male, and bred with furred cats (including the Devon Rex) to try and produce more hairless kittens. The results of the breeding of Prune was litters that had kittens both with and without fur. The hairless kittens were subsequently bred and the breed developed into the mid-late 1970’s. Some of the hairless kittens were also exported to Europe, where the breed was developed there.

Outstanding Physical Trait: The lack of hair/fur.

T

Tonkinese

Country of Origin: USA

Lifespan: 15-18 years                 Breed Size: Medium                

Hair/Fur Length: Semi-Longhair

Colour(s): Champagne, Blue, Natural, Platinum – in solid, point, and mink patterns.

Breed History: The modern version of this breed that we see today is a cross between the Siamese and Burmese, developed in the 1950’s. However in the 1880’s it was a breed in its’ own right, but were known as Chocolate Siamese, and was very close genetically to the Siamese and the Burmese. In the 50’s they went by Golden Siamese but by the 60’s they were renamed to Tonkinese.

Outstanding Physical Trait: The oriental but fuller look – not quite a slender as most oriental type breeds.

U

Ukrainian Levkoy

Country of Origin: Ukraine

Lifespan: 15-19 years                   Breed Size: Medium              

Hair/Fur Length: Hairless          Colour(s): All colours and patterns

Breed History: A cross between the Donskoy (or Russian Hairless) and the Scottish Fold (above) – this is a hairless cat with folded ears, artificially bred 2000-2001 for their unique appearance.

Outstanding Physical Trait: The lack of hair/fur coupled with the folded ears.

V

Van Kedishi (a.k.a. Turkish Van)

Country of Origin: Eastern Turkey (Lake Van region)

Lifespan: 12-17 years                  Breed Size: Medium                 

Hair/Fur Length: Semi-Longhair

Colour(s): Traditionally white with auburn throughout. Modern accepted colours include white with cream, black, blue, tortoiseshell (tortie), blue tortie, blue tabby, brown tabby, tortie tabby or blue tortie tabby.

Breed History: There is a myth relating to the origin of this breed; the Van Kedishi cat was on Noah’s Ark during the flood. Noah’s Ark came to rest on Mount Ararat when the flood was over, which is said to be not too far from Lake Van, and is where these cats headed once they cam off the Ark. It is also said that the coloured markings on their fur are due to God blessing the animals as they came off the Ark. Thought to have originated in the Lake Van region of Turkey, and to have existed there as a domestic breed for centuries, but first brought to Britain in the 1950’s.

Outstanding Physical Trait: The van colour pattern – white with colour on the head and tail only.


All images are open source, Google images, or my own – or photos donated for use by the pet owners.


If you have any questions or comments; please post a comment below, or contact Ali’s Answers via one of my social media pages…
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A-Z: Cat Breeds (6)

Over 8 posts, I am going to go through cat breeds, and cover some basic titbits about the breeds; a little bit of history surrounding the breed, including the original use for the breed, and some other interesting facts.

This, the sixth, post will cover P-R of cat breeds. In the follow-up posts I will look into cat breeds from S-V, and W-Z… basically I am doing an A-Z of cat breeds, covering 1-3 breeds per letter.

If I do not cover the breed of your cat in this post, and you would like me to; please leave the breed in the thoughts comment box below, or post it via the contact page, or get in touch via any social media pages listed at the end of each post – this way I can include your breed in another post (either the follow up, or a repeat with different breeds). Do the same if you want more information than I have provided on any particular cat breed, or if you would like to share a photo of your cat(s)!

P

Persian

Country of Origin: Persia

Lifespan: 10-15 years Breed Size: Medium – Large

Hair/Fur Length: Longhair Colour(s): All colours/ patterns

Breed History: Brought to western Europe, and bred, for aesthetics – the Persian was (amongst the Siamese, the Manx, and other exotic breeds) in the first organised cat show in London, in 1871. The Persian won “best in show”.

Outstanding Physical Trait: The long fur is a signature trait of the Persian. Unfortunately, due to intensive selective breeding, this breed is now also known for their squashed faces and the breathing difficulties that accompanies this aesthetic breeding choice.

Peterbald

Country of Origin: St. Petersberg, Russia

Lifespan: 10+ years Breed Size: Small – Medium

Hair/Fur Length: Very Shorthair – Hairless Colour(s): All colours/ patterns

Breed History: Bred in St. Petersberg, Russia in the early 1990’s this bald cat by crossing a female Oriental Shorthair with a male Don Sphinx. The litter of four kittens is thought to be the origin of this breed. Bred for the bald appearance.

Outstanding Physical Trait: The lack of hair on this oriental-looking breed is the most outstanding feature of the Peterbald cat. There is a type of this breed known as “ultra bald” which does not even have whiskers!

Q

There are no breeds for this letter; however, here is an interesting fact for you all – an un-neutered adult female cat is called a “Queen”! (Fits in with the personality of cats I think!)

R

Ragdoll

Country of Origin: California, USA

Lifespan: 12-15 years Breed Size: Large

Hair/Fur Length: Semi-Longhair

Colour(s): Tabby, seal, blue, red, tortoiseshell, cream, chocolate & lilac colouration in colour-point, mitted & bi-colour patterns

Breed History: Developed in the 1960’s by a breeder named Ann Baker, the origin of this breed is thought to have consisted almost entirely of stray cats. Ann bred a domestic white longhair (named Josephine), that she found loose in her neighbourhood, to other stray cats and also to cats that she owned. By selecting the individuals with the criteria that she wanted, Ann created the Ragdoll breed.

Outstanding Physical Trait: This breed is known for their blue eyes. They are usually born with blue eyes which often stay for life, however not all Ragdolls have blue eyes into adulthood – some deepen to a golden colour as the cat matures.

Rex (Cornish, Selkirk, Devon and La Perm)

Please click the above link to learn more about the La Perm.

Country of Origin: Cornish Rex – Cornwall, UK / Selkirk Rex – Montana, USA

Lifespan: 10-15 Breed Size: Medium

Hair/Fur Length: Cornish – Shorthair / Selkirk – Shorthair and Longhair

Colour(s): Cornish – Solid colours: white, black, blue, red, cream, lavender, chocolate; patterns: tortoiseshell, calico, bi-colour, pointed. / Selkirk – Any colour and pattern

Breed History: Cornish – In the 1950’s Mrs Nina Ennismore and Miss Winifred Macalister, noticed that Serena (their pet tortishell/white shorthair) had an odd kitten in the her litter. The odd kitten was named Kallibunker and was the only one of the litter (of five) born with a curly coat and whiskers; he was the original Cornish Rex. The father of this litter was unknown but it is likely it was Serena’s brother Ginger (a shorthair red tabby).
Selkirk – This curly coated cat originated from a pet cat named Miss DePesto of Noface or “Pest” for short. Pest was found in a shelter in Montana, and ended up with a Persian cat breeder, Jeri Newman, who bred her with a black Persian. Pest produced a litter of six; three of which were curly coated (Selkirk Rex) kittens.

Outstanding Physical Trait: Cornish – Described as having an egg-shaped head, with a rounded forehead and high cheekbones. However, again, the obvious trait is the short, soft and wavy fur. / Selkirk – Described as having a round head with no flat planes; again the curl of the coat is the main outstanding trait. The curl of the Selkirk loose curled, and shows up more on the longhair than the shorthair.

Cornish Rex (left) and Selkirk Rex (right)


All images are open source, Google images, or my own – or photos donated for use by the pet owners.


If you have any questions or comments; please post a comment below, or contact Ali’s Answers via one of my social media pages…
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A-Z: Cat Breeds (5)

Over 8 posts, I am going to go through cat breeds, and cover some basic titbits about the breeds; a little bit of history surrounding the breed, including the original use for the breed, and some other interesting facts.

This, the fifth, post will cover M-O of cat breeds. In the follow-up posts I will look into cat breeds from P-R, S-V, and W-Z… basically I am doing an A-Z of cat breeds, covering 1-3 breeds per letter.

If I do not cover the breed of your cat in this post, and you would like me to; please leave the breed in the thoughts comment box below, or post it via the contact page, or get in touch via any social media pages listed at the end of each post – this way I can include your breed in another post (either the follow-up, or a repeat with different breeds). Do the same if you want more information than I have provided on any particular cat breed, or if you would like to share a photo of your cat(s)!

M

Maine Coon

Country of Origin: America (State of Maine)

Lifespan: 12-17 years                  Breed Size: Large

Hair/Fur Length: Long               Colour(s):  Any

Breed History: One of the folk tales tells the story of long-haired cats on the ship of Capatin Charles Coon, departing the ship when docked and mating with the local cats – the long-haired kittens became known as “Coon’s Cats”.

Outstanding Physical Trait:  The sheer size of these domestic cats is quite unique; as well as the lucious long hair.

Maine Coon

Manx

Country of Origin: Isle of Man

Lifespan: 8-14 years                Breed Size: Medium

Hair/Fur Length: Shorthair or Longhair

Colour(s): Solid, tabby, tortoiseshell and calico. Chocolate/ lavender colours and pointed are not accepted in show, but do exist.

Breed History: This breed matures very slowly, and may not be fully grown until 5 years old. They are thought to have arrived via ship – different stories tell of different ships; Japanese trader, Viking settlers, Spanish armada. What is certain is the tailless cat breed inhabited the Isle, and the island became known for them – hence the cat breed being named after the island.

Outstanding Physical Trait:  The most noticeable is the tail length / lack of tail. This breed also has hind legs higher than their front legs, and are known for their round features.

Manx

N

Norwegian Forest Cat

Country of Origin: Norway

Lifespan: 12-16                                     Breed Size: Large

Hair/Fur Length: Longhair

Colour(s): Almost every colour/pattern except for chocolate/ lavender colours and pointed.

Breed History: This cat is called “Skogkatt” in Norway, which literally translates as “forest cat”. This breed is said to have been the choice pet for Vikings, and it is theorised that  Viking traders brought them with them on their ships, as ratters/mousers. Still used for this purpose on farms nowadays. Like the Manx, this breed also matures slowly and is fully grown at approximately 5 years old.

Outstanding Physical Trait:  The stunning long fur of this cat – it is an insulating, waterproof double coat (designed to withstand harsh temperatures of its country of origin). The  longer, coarse guard hairs cover a dense undercoat. The cat has a frontal ruff, a bushy tail, full britches, and tufted paws – more insulation for living in a country bordering the Arctic.

Norwegian Forest Cat

O

Ocicat

Country of Origin: USA

Lifespan: 12-15                           Breed Size: M

Hair/Fur Length: Shorthair

Colour(s): Bred for spots, but also comes in four other patterns: ticked, classic tabby, solid, and pointed.

Breed History: This is a spotted, domestic cat – selectively bred to look like wild cats (named after the Ocelot). When a breeder, Virginia Daly, crossed a seal-point Siamese with a ruddy Abyssinian in 1964 the resulting kittens looked like Abys; when one of this litter was crossed with a Siamese, it resulted in a litter of Aby-pointed Siamese but also one kitten with an ivory-coloured coat, with gold spots. This spotted kitten was named Tonga and  was neutered and sold as a pet. When repeated breeding resulted in more spotted kittens, they were used to found a new breed – the Ocicat.

Outstanding Physical Trait:  Spotted coat; wild look.

Ocicat

Oriental Shorthair

Country of Origin: Britain (man-made breed)

Lifespan: 10-14                              Breed Size: Small/Medium

Hair/Fur Length: Shorthair

Colour(s): Solid, shaded, smoke, parti-color, bi-color, tabby, patch-tabby, blotched tabby, pointed, spotted, ticked, mackerel… there are estimated to be over 600 colour/pattern combinations for this breed!

Breed History: This breed came about from selective breeding of the Siamese, to explore colour and pattern possibilities, by crossing the Siamese with other breeds; cross breeding was also to widen the gene pool of the Siamese, due to devastation during World War II. breeders out-bred the Siamese to restore the breed and keep gene diversity, in the 1950’s.

Outstanding Physical Trait:  Orientals come in more colours and patterns than any other breed!

Blotched Tabby                                  Solid, Chocolate


All images are open source, Google images, or my own – or photos donated for use by the pet owners.


If you have any questions or comments; please post a comment below, or contact Ali’s Answers via one of my social media pages…
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A-Z: Cat Breeds (4)

Over 8 posts, I am going to go through cat breeds, and cover some basic titbits about the breeds; a little bit of history surrounding the breed, including the original use for the breed, and some other interesting facts.

This, the fourth post, will cover J-L of cat breeds. In the follow-up posts I will look into cat breeds from M-O, P-R, S-V, and W-Z… basically I am doing an A-Z of cat breeds, covering 1-3 breeds per letter.

If I do not cover the breed of your cat in this post, and you would like me to; please leave the breed in the thoughts comment box below, or post it via the contact page, or get in touch via any social media pages listed at the end of each post – this way I can include your breed in another post (either the follow-up, or a repeat with different breeds). Do the same if you want more information than I have provided on any particular cat breed, or if you would like to share a photo of your cat(s)!

J

Javanese

Country of Origin: America

Lifespan: 10-15 years                           Breed Size: Medium

Hair/Fur Length: Longhair                Colour(s): Colourpoint – all

Breed History: This breed does not  come from Java, Indonesia; but was so named because Java is an island very close to Bali. This breed was developed during a controlled breeding programme in the 1950’s, using the existing cat breeds – Siamese and Balinese.

Outstanding Physical Trait:  The pixie-like features and large ears; the long fur of the lovely oriental-type breed.

Javanese
Javanese

Japanese Bobtail

Country of Origin: Japan and South Asia

Lifespan: 10-13 years     Breed Size: Small/Medium    Hair/Fur Length: Shorthair/Longhair

Colour(s): All colours – solid colours, bi-coloured, calico, and van-coloured (coloured on head and rump/tail only). The most common colouration is calico or mi-ke; this colour is also though to be lucky.

Breed History: The Japanese Bobtail is thought to have occurred without human involvement. The Japanese Bobtail is depicted in paintings and woodcuts of ancient Japanese temples; showing the love of the people for this breed.
In 1602 in Japan, silkworms were under threat from rats; the Japanese government had all cats set free to deal with the rodent problem. Japanese Bobtails commonly lived on farms (including silkworm farms) and were invaluable in rodent control.

Outstanding Physical Trait:  Of course the outstanding physical trait of this adorable little kitty is the dainty little “bobtail”. The tail is said to be unique to each individual cat within the breed; like a finger print, or the markings of a giraffe.

Japanese Bobtail
Japanese Bobtail

K

Korat

Country of Origin: Korat, Thailand (hence the name)

Lifespan: 13-15 years              Breed Size: Medium             Hair/Fur Length: Shorthair

Colour(s): Whilst silver-tipped blue (looks like a slate-blue/grey) is the only accepted colour, the Korat has been known to come in colour variations; such as lilac-coloured and white-coloured, as well as marked fur.

Breed History: Smud Khoi of Cats” or “The Cat Book of Poems” contains the earliest (known) record of the Korat. This book was produced some time between 1350-1767; which in Thailand’s history was known as the Ayutthaya Period. The Korat was introduce in America around 1959, when a couple of Korat cats were sent by a friend (from Bangkok) to US cat enthusiast Jean Johnson. Jean and her husband were taken with Siamese cats, but became interested in the Korat whilst staying in Thailand in 1954. Jean bred the 2 cats; out-breeding them with the blue-point Siamese to avoid inbreeding. This was the establishment of the first Korats in the US. More Korats came to America in the 1960’s; by 1966 the Cat Fancier’s Association (CFA) had included this new breed in championships/ competitions.

Outstanding Physical Trait:  The unique silver-tipped blue colouration give the Korat an almost shimmering shine to its coat. Their coat has often been described as having a “halo” effect.

Korat
Korat

L

LaPerm

Country of Origin: America (Oregon)

Lifespan: 10-15 years                                                  Breed Size: Small

Hair/Fur Length: Shorthair to Longhair             Colour(s): All colours/patterns

Breed History: The produce of an unplanned litter from a pair of barn cats, in 1982; and one unique kitten with a curly coat. Owner, Linda Koehl, named the kitten Curly and went onto breed from her. Using Manx and Siamese cat breeds in her breeding programmes, Linda eventually produced a new, genetically different, cat breed by 1987.

Outstanding Physical Trait:  The curly coat of indeterminate length, and the indeterminate tightness of the curl.

LaPerm
LaPerm


All images are open source, Google images, or my own – or photos donated for use by the pet owners.


If you have any questions or comments; please post a comment below, or contact Ali’s Answers via one of my social media pages…
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. Facebook (Ali’s Animal Answers)
. Twitter (@AlisAnswers)
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A-Z: Cat Breeds (3)

Over 8 posts, I am going to go through cat breeds, and cover some basic titbits about the breeds; a little bit of history surrounding the breed, including the original use for the breed, and some other interesting facts.

This, the third post, will cover G-I of cat breeds. In the follow-up posts I will look into cat breeds from J-L, M-O, P-R, S-V, and W-Z… basically I am doing an A-Z of cat breeds, covering 1-3 breeds per letter.

If I do not cover the breed of your cat in this post, and you would like me to; please leave the breed in the thoughts comment box below, or post it via the contact page, or get in touch via any social media pages listed at the end of each post – this way I can include your breed in another post (either the follow-up, or a repeat with different breeds). Do the same if you want more information than I have provided on any particular cat breed, or if you would like to share a photo of your cat(s)!

G

German Rex

Country of Origin: Germany (as the name suggests)

Lifespan: 12-14 years                                         Breed Size: Medium

Hair/Fur Length: (Very) Shorthair

Colour(s): White, Blue, Black, Cream, Red, Brown, Frost, Platinum, Fawn, Chocolate, Chestnut, Cinnamon, Lavender, Champagne, Seal.

Breed History: So it goes that the first German Rex was a female feral, curly-coated, black cat. She was discovered shortly after the end of the Second World War by Dr. R. Scheuer-Karpin. She rescued the cat after seeing her wandering the gardens of the Hufeland Hospital, amongst the ruins of East Berlin. Dr. R. Scheuer-Karpin named her Lammchen (Lambkin) because of her lamb-like curly coat. Lammchen possessed the same gene for curly fur that is in Cornish Rex; and produced many litters. In 1957, she was cross-bred with one of her offspring; and the first litter of German Rex’s resulted from that mating.

Outstanding Physical Trait:  The pixie-like features and large ears; and of course the unique, curly coat! (Unique to the Rex breeds.)

German Rex
German Rex

H

Havana Brown

Country of Origin: England

Lifespan: 14-16 years                                         Breed Size: Medium

Hair/Fur Length: Shorthair                Colour(s): Chocolate

Breed History: In the early 1950s, a UK breeder called Isobel Munro-Smith was trying to breed Siamese but with black points as opposed to the standard seal brown. She was doing this by mating Seal Point Siamese with black shorthaired cats. In 1952 she had a litter with 3 black kittens, and also discovered a brown male kitten in the litter, with similar shape to a Siamese with the same characteristically large ears and long tail; and is thought of as the first recognised Havana.

Outstanding Physical Trait:  The chocolate-brown colour of the coat is the trademark of this breed.

Havana Brown
Havana Brown

Highlander

Country of Origin: England (Devonshire)

Lifespan: 13-15 years                                         Breed Size: Large

Hair/Fur Length: (Very) Shorthair                Colour(s): All colours/patterns

Breed History: Minority breed which was initially established in 2004; but the breed was not properly defined until 2005. Bred to be a domestic breed with the appearance of a wild cat; without using any wild cats to contribute genes.

Outstanding Physical Trait:  The wild-like features and patterned coat; the curled ears, with tufts; usually this breed has a short tail ranging from 1 inch in length to hock (back leg “knee-joint”) length.

Highlander
Highlander

I

No domestic breeds beginning with this letter.


All images are open source, Google images, or my own – or photos donated for use by the pet owners.


If you have any questions or comments; please post a comment below, or contact Ali’s Answers via one of my social media pages…
. Google+ (Ali’s Animal Answers)
. Facebook (Ali’s Animal Answers)
. Twitter (@AlisAnswers)
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A-Z: Cat Breeds (2)

Over 8 posts, I am going to go through cat breeds, and cover some basic titbits about the breeds; a little bit of history surrounding the breed, including the original use for the breed, and some other interesting facts.

This, the second, post will cover D-F of cat breeds. In the follow-up posts I will look into cat breeds from G-I, J-L, M-O, P-R, S-V, and W-Z… basically I am doing an A-Z of cat breeds, covering 1-3 breeds per letter.

If I do not cover the breed of your cat in this post, and you would like me to; please leave the breed in the thoughts comment box below, or post it via the contact page, or get in touch via any social media pages listed at the end of each post – this way I can include your breed in another post (either the follow-up, or a repeat with different breeds). Do the same if you want more information than I have provided on any particular cat breed, or if you would like to share a photo of your cat(s)!

D

Devon Rex

Country of Origin: England (Devonshire)

Lifespan: 13-15 years                                         Breed Size: Medium

Hair/Fur Length: (Very) Shorthair                Colour(s): All colours/patterns

Breed History: In the late 1950’s/ early 1960’s Miss Beryl Cox found that a feral cat in her care had given birth to a rather odd-looking curly-haired kitten within the litter. The kitten had pixie-like features and wavy curls; she bred from him to continue the gene.

Outstanding Physical Trait:  The pixie-like features and large ears; and of course the unique, curly coat!

Devon Rex
Devon Rex

E

Egyptian Mau

Country of Origin: Egypt

Lifespan: 15-18 years                              Breed Size: Small/Medium

Hair/Fur Length: Shorthair                  Colour(s): Bronze, Silver, Smoke

Breed History: Spotted domestic cats have been recorded in ancient Egypt; it is that the current Egyptian Mau is a decent of these. The breed almost disappeared in Europe, prior to the First World War. However, in 1956, the Egyptian Mau was brought to America by Russian princess, Nathalie Troubetskoy; who established a programme of selective breeding to save the breed from extinction.

Outstanding Physical Trait: The wild-looking, spotted coat pattern.

Egyptian Mau
Egyptian Mau

Exotic Shorthair

Country of Origin: America

Lifespan: 12-15 years                              Breed Size: Medium

Hair/Fur Length: Shorthair    Colour(s): White, blue, black, red, cream, chocolate and lilac;
silver, blue and gold chinchilla.

Breed History: Developed as a shorthair version of the Persian in the late 1950s; when American cat breeder crossed a Persian with a brown Burmese. Later breeders crossed the Persian with the American Shorthair and Russian Blue.

Outstanding Physical Trait: The shorthair is a distinct physical trait, as it was bred for this to differ from the longhair of the Persian. Like the Persian, they have flat faces; with big, round eyes and round faces.

Exotic Shorthair
Exotic Shorthair

F

Foldex (a.k.a. Exotic Fold)

Country of Origin: Quebec, Canada

Lifespan: 12-15 years                                                  Breed Size: Medium

Hair/Fur Length: Short/med/longhair                  Colour(s): All colours and patterns

Breed History: Developed in 1992 by cross breeding the Exotic Shorthair (above) with the Scottish Fold (see post 7). However, it was not accepted as a breed until 2006 (but only in Canada, at present).

Outstanding Physical Trait: The folded ears (giving this breed its name).

Foldex
Foldex


All images are open source, Google images, or my own – or photos donated for use by the pet owners.


If you have any questions or comments; please post a comment below, or contact Ali’s Answers via one of my social media pages…
. Google+ (Ali’s Animal Answers)
. Facebook (Ali’s Animal Answers)
. Twitter (@AlisAnswers)
. LinkedIn (Ali Holloway)